Stop Training like a body builder and train like an Athlete

Everyone is guilty of it. You see the big bodybuilder guys on social media and the side of protein packets and think, "If I train like them, then I could look like them, right?"

But here's why its not working. 

These bodybuilding types are sharing their workouts and some of their meal plans with you, (for a low lifetime subscription of $19.90 p/w), however, the intensity and shear dedication probably isn't going to transfer through for most. 

I mean, who has time to target their biceps in 8 different ways, 4 times per week? Along with ensuring that you "get those crunches, hit the inside/ outside of your chest, as well as hitting that brachioradialis, bro!" 

Not that it can't be done, and I'm not downplaying the need for bodybuilding. It plays a huge role in both aesthetics and performance, I am just saying that for the general population looking to build some strength, increase lean muscle mass and drop body fat percentage on a large scale, then following a "bi's, tri's and abs" workout plan you found on "shreddaz.com" probably isn't your most effective move. 

Anyone heard of the 80/20 rule? 

It means that 80% of your results will come from 20% of your time and effort if you work effectively. 

Think of  "Farmer Joe" shovelling straw into a wheelbarrow vs "Farmer Mo" who decides he wants to pick each bit of straw up individually and place it in the wheelbarrow. They both get told they have an hour to do so. 

Farmer Joe goes hell for leather and gets all the straw into the wheelbarrow in around 46 minutes and is sweating his hairy little farmer balls off. Great work Joe. 

Mo on the other hand, works until the hour, getting only half the work done, but decides he'll spend another hour putting straw in nice and slow. Even after both hours are done, Mo still hasn't finished but decides he'll come back tomorrow and do the rest. 

Don't be Mo ! 

Mo is also the type of guy who wants to get bigger arms and chest, look athletic whilst decreasing body fat, but spends his time at the gym doing curls and chest presses with limited intensity, and hopes he will get the same result as Joe. 

Meanwhile, Joe is in the corner super-setting squats, deadlifts and pull ups with perfect technique, sweating his little farmer balls off once again and is getting amazing results. 

See, for the average "Joe" (see what I did there) that wants strong looking arms and abs, you'll get a much better bang for your buck if you follow a strength and conditioning program, led by a coach, rather than the latest edition of "Guns and abs" found in a health magazine. 

Now once again, this isn't a pissing contest of whose sport is better (Crossfit vs bodybuilding), I've done both and still combine aspects of both modalities within my training. 

It is purely determined by "total work capacity" and "training volume" coupled with nutrition of course. 

Those with a higher work capacity and training volume will see more results than those with less. 

Training Volume: Reps x Sets x Weight 

Work Capacity: Intensity x Training Volume

Joe vs Mo. 

The best part is, its not the end of the world. The art of learning how to train in an effective strength and conditioning environment is becoming a lot easier, and more time effective.

After you've done the sums it becomes more cost effective than you may think.

Here's a little example.

Continue paying $19 a week at your current gym which you've been at for 2 years.

You still haven't gotten the body you're after, but this year is your year. And plus, if you don't go, its only $19 a week right?

 = $ 988

OR 

Join a small community of like minded people who you can train with on a daily basis, have a coach who train you in the correct techniques, program sessions which will be the most effective way to help you (based on their research, not bro science) and will keep you accountable to reaching your goals. Within 8 weeks you would have hit your goals, learnt more than 100+ take home points and techniques to help you continue developing your athletic potential as well as met a whole bunch of legends who inspire you to train hard. 

= $ 400 - $799 (based on who you choose) 

Is it the money? or is it the commitment to change that scares you?